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Home » Blog » Scor-zay-zee: my battle with cannabis, schizophrenia and very cheap trainers | Music | The Guardian

Scor-zay-zee: my battle with cannabis, schizophrenia and very cheap trainers | Music | The Guardian

“I was a chubby white kid who wasn’t very cool at school,” says Scor-zay-zee. “I took up rapping because I wanted to be cool.” For one fleeting moment in 2004, the underground Nottingham rapper became exactly that: the most talked-about man in music. His incendiary, anti-establishment track Great Britain was picked up by Radio 1, causing such a stir when DJ Zane Lowe played it for the first time that he played it again in the same show. The rightwing press were up in arms that the BBC played it at all. A ferocious attack on the state of Britain, the song compared the Queen to Saddam Hussein and accused the state of conspiring to murder Princess Diana. The Telegraph labelled it a “diatribe against the British way of life” and declared it “more offensive than God Save the Queen”. In parliament, MPs called for it to be banned. As record labels scrambled to sign Scor-zay-zee, The Streets’ Mike Skinner offered to work with him.

Scor-zay-zee: my battle with cannabis, schizophrenia and very cheap trainers | Music | The Guardian.

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